VERNON WARING : Ennui
WARD KELLEY : A Temple in the Path of Xerxes
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Ennui A Temple in the Path of Xerxes  
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VERNON WARING
Ennui 
Lately I've forgotten names of friends I've known for years, and sadnesses creep over me with a suddeness I cannot explain. Some brief anguish slants across my sunburned face, and all I welcome now are days and nights of rain. A letter came for me the other day, yet I can't bring myself to open it. No fear accompanies my reluctance - just a cryptic photograph lurking in my mind of a casket turned the wrong way toward a flowered wall. All I have now are bitter memories of her porcelain smile and frightened eyes, her unsure lips whispering quiet lies, her handwriting so eerie on that final damning note.
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Poetry endangers the established order  of the soul - Plato

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Ennui A Temple in the Path of Xerxes  
POETRY requires a mature audience ENTER only if you are 18+ under 18? GoTo Games

WARD KELLEY
A Temple in the Path of Xerxes
Stone, frigid columns, pungent fumes from copper bowls on burning pedestals, the chilling breeze still penetrates from the acute night outside. These pillars are clammy, as though they can express my fear of the invaders who arrive tomorrow to annihilate our ways. My children are safe at the coast, their mother spirited them down with the slaves and my brother . . . and now only my sword remains here with me. By the manner the wind easily dispels the incense and holy smoke, I can understand our gods have also left this place . . . perhaps they too are at the shore. So it is only myself and my mercenaries who will face the conquerors when this night drifts onward. Why does a man stay in place after the very gods have fled? Is this the nature of a man . . . to rail against the inevitable world, while it is in the nature of gods to dissipate at whim? One must stand, while others are smoke for the awe of future generations. I cannot imagine this place without myself . . . I touch the marble, still moist, and fear I sense the dawn nearing, yet I see it is still better to be a man than a god when death arises with the breaking day, for men may readily complete themselves while gods can only cry at the results of their fornications.
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You Take Advantage of My Good MoodTOP Ennui  VERNON WARING .
A Temple in the Path of Xerxes]BTM A Temple in the Path of Xerxes  WARD KELLEY . Xerxes I (circa 519 - 465 BCE), was a king of Persia. To punish the Greeks for their victory over the Persians at Marathon in 490 BCE, he invaded Greece, his vast army penetrating to Thrace, Thessaly, and Locris. Three hundred Spartans made a courageous but suicidal stand at Thermopylae; after ten days Xerxes broke through, and eventually burned Athens. Returning to Asia, Xerxes so disgusted his subjects with his debauchery that he was at last murdered by the captain of his own palace guard.
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